A Rare Moment of Respite

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  • A lonely moment that simply begs for a boy to lose himself in the world of music…

    I had the opportunity to chaperone a Spring Camp at a local ranch. Of course, this screams of photographic opportunities. It also gave me the chance to test out a new waistpack, to see how it would function as a camera pack.

    I’m looking forward to doing a few more hikes this year and while the Think Tank Digital Holster works great, there’s a definite need for more space if I’m carrying another lens. I considered the other Think Tank waist bags, but decided to try the Maxpedition Sabercat. Initially, I was concerned about sizing, but it easily holds a 5D Mk II + 16-35mm + 50mm, plus a 100mm Macro in one side pocket and a 430EX flash in the other. Plus, there’s still room in a top pocket and front pocket for incidentals. The MOLLE webbing on the waist strap accommodates a longer pouch, current home of a 1L water bottle and potential future home of a 70-200mm. While the waist strap is substantial, it’s still more comfortable with a shoulder strap, and I’m looking at ways to simplify this with a backpack strap connection.

    20120315-165200-Canon PowerShot S95-2736 x 3648

    I digress…so, I had a chance to test this for three days and I really liked it. While the bag isn’t padded, getting the camera out was fairly hassle-free. Using the bag as a platform made it easy to change lenses. All the pockets make organization a snap. No pain and all gain, so to speak. I’m not sure if my glee was carried over in the photos, but this horse looked fairly deferential. Nearing the end of a long day, but there were plenty of moments to capture and hone that photographer’s eye. Children, of course, make delightful subjects, but there’s more than just random shutter clicks at work.

    Some of my best moments in photography are when children are acting naturally. They convey a wide range of emotions and, to use an old trope, they have a purity if their expressions that they don’t even try hiding. As their unique personalities are discovered, the photos can start to tell a story about them, over time, that tracks their rapid growth. It made me realize that the inherent value of a photo is tied deeply to your knowledge of the subject. While the rage in forums is to discuss how X photo can sell for $Y, perhaps that purchaser feels that connection, for whatever reason, and has the resources to buy it. Without that connection, I wouldn’t be able to justify the price.

     

    20120315-170023-Canon EOS 5D Mark II-3744 x 5616So, a seemingly ordinary picture of random, rusted hardware may not mean much to someone passing through. To me, it represents a specific moment in time, preceded and followed by other moments. I recall what struck me about the lighting, bringing the camera up, walking around, framing the scene and finally….*click.* At the time, I don’t know if it’s going to be worthwhile. This photo joins over 1,100 brothers and sisters, some deliberate twins and triplets, others more unique. It’s only after reviewing the entire series do I balance the content to reflect a journey of the experience…to tell the story.

    It’s one of the things I focus on when approaching a photographic subject…how do I convey the experience? I experimented on Kauai. I practiced on various field trips. I reached for this goal on the trip to Japan. This latest journey….well, the largest compliment I could receive….”It really gave me a feeling of what the kids experienced during those three days.”nd, framing the scene and finally….*click.* At the time, I don’t know if it’s going to be worthwhile. This photo joins over 1,100 brothers and sisters, some deliberate twins and triplets, others more unique. It’s only after reviewing the entire series do I balance the content to reflect a journey of the experience…to tell the story.

    Well…you better believe I was smiling. 

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